Posts Tagged With: urban fantasy

Chloe Neill “Hard Bitten” | Chicagoland Vampires 4

1I get used to series. Then I read them, even if I don’t particularly like them. Same happened to me with Chloe Neill series Chicagoland Vampires. Lucky for me, though, “Hard Bitten” (Chicagoland Vampires 4; ISBN 04512333328; 350p. Goodreads) ended up with a very interesting note.

Tension is ever rising in House Cardogan. Protesters outside the windows demand day and night for these dangerous bloodsucking creatures to go back where they came from – hell. Some people go missing after especially brutal raves take place. New drug is rumored to be on the market, messing things up. And, seemingly, all of these strings lead to House Cardogan. Its master, Sullivan is under pressure from two different ramparts: the mayor of the city, and the vampire authorities from across the pond. Pressure itself wouldn’t be hard to handle, of course. It’s their orders that put him between an anvil and a hammer. One side wants him to take care of this, because Cardogan looks involved. Other side wants him to stop meddling in what the head of Cardogan is not supposed to meddle. So, clan reputation or his own skin?

Merit, on the other hand, seems to have found a way around all this mess. After all, the orders were to her liege, not her directly. And what her liege doesn’t know, her liege cannot be blamed for, right? Thus she picks up her contacts in dark deep places, and sets off after those who survived the raves. Sadly, the deeper she digs, the less she likes the secrets. Some of them are about to flip her whole world upside down. Like the one about her getting turned into a vampire…

The ending was a very interesting choice author made, and it got me real curious of how will this develop then. Still, I really won’t be recommending these to anyone who didn’t get this far to begin with. 3 out of 5 from me. Will read the next one though.

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Categories: 3-5, Books of Supernaturals, Books: Everything, Fantasy Books, urban fantasy, vampires | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Elizabeth May – The Falconer [1]

FalconercoverfinalAh. There are books you read in one sitting, because they’re just THAT good. And then there are books you read in one sitting, because you already know what’s going to happen in the next page. I’m sad to say that “The Falconer” by Elizabeth May (The Falconer 1; ISBN 1452114234; 378p.; Goodreads) is the latter kind. If you read more of this YA kind of fantasy, there’s no reason for you to pick up this one. In short: time trial for the chosen one to close a thing before bad things come out of the thing.

She is one of the kind. And the last of her kind. The awkward Scottish lass leading her double life. During the day hours she is attempting her best to salvage her reputation scraps, and build new contraptions on the spare time (steampunk theme). And at night time (and I’m almost quoting here), she’s trying to sate her unquenchable bloodlust, her need for murder, power, by killing the very bad fae. The fae are usually all teeth and claws, fairly scary if you ask me, and they all feed on human energy. Those who resemble humans more can put you to such awe, that you’ll be tempted to throw your reputation in 1844 Edingburg right there, out the window. That’s called Faestruck, by the way, and our so very bad and murderous heroine is apparently immune. Apparently.

Time Trial begins. A gate to fae prison is opening, and she’s the only one who can close it before all the bad things come pouring out to hunt humans as they used to, and destroy all the things. So she packs up her flying contraption, her own made weapons, which are impressive, I admit, and the Mister Unfriendly Fae friend for whom, of course, she’s developing feelings, and goes to close that damned thing! Did I mention it has to be done during specific lunar event? Well, in my humble opinion, that was obvious anyway.

Now, don’t get me wrong, not all is bad about this book. I’ve simply had oh so many like this one in my hands before, that I can no longer appreciate the simple beat-the-clock script. If you don’t read many of this kind, it’s a very good starter book. Story has all the things, Steampunk, decent jokes, funny heroine, the inhuman love interest, best guy friend who will marry you because that’s his duty as your friend: to defend your tarnished honor, and references to Scottish folk tales, that are pretty damn great, if you ask me. But for me, in my own personal opinion, this is not worth more than 3 out of 5, and that’s mostly because her fiance drank his own tea, and then hers too, because her butler was too slow in filling his cup.

Categories: 3-5, Books of Occult, Books of Supernaturals, Books: Everything, Fantasy Books, urban fantasy | Tags: , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Bobbie Peers – William Wenton and the Luridium Thief

31176180I think I mentioned this before a time or two: I like urban fantasy. I like most fantasy, but I find Urban one to be as high up there, as, say, High fantasy. It’s just different and beautiful, if done right. So when offered “William Wenton and the Luridium Thief” by Bobbie Peers (ISBN 9789955239093; 240p.; Goodreads) I jumped at the opportunity, and I’ve nothing to regret.

William is an odd child by the common definition of “normal”. He sits home solving puzzles and secrets, and reads through thousands and thousands of his grandfather’s books that no one else feels like touching. He goes by a fake surname too, since his family came from England to start a new life in Norway soon after an accident in which Will nearly died, and his father was left paralyzed from waist down. Soon after his grandfather disappeared too, and now they must hide. Hide, as in: blend in, don’t stand out, stop getting into trouble, stop solving things, William! Not exactly something the boy can do. Especially not when the Impossible Code surfaces and is being brought all the way to Norway to an expedition his whole class is going to!

Lots of secrets. Lots of robots, codes, mysteries. If I can describe it whole in one sentence, I’d say: Kingsman for kids. Things are not teched-out, so it’s perfect for the audience it is aimed for. There’s no magic, all is made with science, so might be a good motivator for those who will soon have school to start too. Pointing that out since I’m pretty sure Harry didn’t motivate me to study maths when he studied transfiguration. I give this book solid 4 out of 5, and am eagerly awaiting for second book to be translated!

Categories: 4-5, Books: Everything, urban fantasy | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Jacob Grey – Ferals: The Crow Talker [1]

25236399I love urban fantasy. It’s a good resting genre for those who love fantasy in general. And when it’s not too good in plot – it usually compensates in settings and/or backstory. “Ferals: The Crow Talker” by Jacob Grey (ISBN 978-9955-23-901-7; 295p.; Goodreads) is not a pure urban fantasy, but the fantasy part in it compensated well for everything. Truly scary bad guys, wicked “Dark Lord“, and one or two measured plot twists. I’d say this book is Nicholas Flamel meets Ranger’s Apprentice, if I had to compare it to anything.

Caw is this young orphan boy living with three crows out in the abandoned park, in a nest he made himself. He keeps having nightmares of his parents pushing him out of the window when he was but a little child, and crows carrying him away. The question of why they did so bothers him night and day. Yet soon a distraction like no other strikes. Dream changes, and becomes even more of a nightmare than before, for in the background there stands a pale tall man, surrounded by spiders, eyes black as the void. And the nightmare soon becomes reality, when the white crow, who was both mute and blind, speaks a warning: Spiders are coming, and we’re their prey.

First half of the book is not the easiest to pull through, since plot has to be explained via that time, only natural. We’re introduced to the world where among regular people walk those who speak and command other beings. Caw being one who can speak to the crows. Situation we’re hurled into soon demands others of this breed to be found, and there is where the fun begins in earnest. We learn of great war that turned their city into the ruins they live in now. We learn who did it, and how is it possible that the long dead man is a threat to the world again.

So all in all, I did like the book. Can’t say it’s my new favorite, but definitely something I would willingly look into. I am very happy we received a translation of the first book already too, since we definitely don’t get enough of this type YA urban fantasy in our shelves (I guess it could be categorized as children’s book too, since it’s child-safe, unless they’re afraid of spiders). I’ll give it 4 out of 5, but expect rate to go higher as books cease needing to explain what’s going on.

Categories: 4-5, Books of Occult, Books of Supernaturals, Books: Everything, Fantasy Books | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

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