Posts Tagged With: biography

Amy Schumer – The Girl with the Lower Back Tattoo

29405093I love Amy Schumer stand-ups, and I love the reactions of people who’d watch them with you. I could give you a long why’s-that story, but maybe next time. Right now, let’s talk about her biography “The Girl with the Lower Back Tattoo” (ISBN 1501139886; 323p.; Goodreads). I can’t say I enjoyed it much, but it really had some super good points, that made it worth the while.

 

I love how this wonderful comedian owns her truths, and shameful moments. Instead of letting you call her out, she’ll go ahead, and stand up to tell you about it herself! And it’s great not only on a personal scale of her, me, you. It’s important in a larger scale of the world too. For instance, she mentioned the stigma in America of Old Money vs Young Money. Old Money equals being born into money. You’re a rich refined kid in a fancy car, with little understanding of what this poverty thing is. Young Money is the kind you made on your own, being born average, or in said poverty. Amy bravely admits acting like trash who just won the lottery, not wanting for anything, not saving now, when she could, and instead eating dumplings for months to come later, when she couldn’t. But then she mentions the other aspect of Young Money. The giving aspect. Someone with little to no understanding of what it’s like to need, let alone want something will not feel the same joy Amy had when she finally could afford to give her sister a 10k check. I mean, I guess they could be that good of people, and feel joy, but how many rich people with sense of generosity do you know? Old Money and generous? So here Amy Schumer stands: you can’t judge me, I already judged myself, we’re done, time to move on!

And that’s just one of the great examples. There’s plenty of less good-humored ones, less funny, and even truly sad episodes. Like her broken family, sick father, mother who can’t seem to find her spot in this life, the forced cynicism, ought to protect from attachments to people who will inevitably leave your life anyway.

And while I see great value in this book, and respect Amy Schumer, I can’t say I enjoyed this book as much as I did some other biographies of wonderful women out there. But I guess that’s the thing, right? She passed a good message, and you don’t have to like the way it was given, to see the value in it. 4 out of 5 to the girl with the lower back tattoo.

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Categories: 4-5, Biographies, Books: Everything, Books: Funny! | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Lilly Singh – How to be a Bawse: A Guide to Conquering Life

Bawse_final-coverFor past two months I worked twice as hard as I normally do. Worst is not the tiredness I constantly feel, but rather the lack of point in the work, since more work is not necessarily rewarding, or at least it isn’t in short-term. Lilly Singh and her “How to be a Bawse: a Guide to Conquering Life” (ISBN 0425286460; 272p.; Goodreads) was a natural choice here, for a tired, drained mind. It’s biographical, but not a biography. It’s not “the Secret”, and by far not the sugar-coated guide to success via “be positive! love your self! be kind and work hard!”. Rather, it’s a book on previously depressed unicorn who survived, and is about to tell you how conquer.

If a behavior results in free cake, one must always perform that behavior.” – Lilly Singh

My life is often burdened by weekend-hustlers, people who had months to do a fairly big amount of work, but decided to roll their sleeves up on the final weekend, and I, as a translator, need to hurry up for both of us (lesson one: deadlines). Priority fees are then argued (lesson two: bargaining), because these weekend-hustlers feel entitled to their own time, and their own work (lesson three: sense of entitlement), and see me as an obstacle, rather than a tool. And I wish I could translate this damn book for them too (lesson four: goals!). Using her own life as example, and then adding a few more for good measure, Lilly teaches us how hustling, prioritizing, and tunnel-vision really works. It helped me unwind, taught me things, gave me insight on who this Lilly is (I’m a long-term fan, this is just phrasing), and best of all, I can now improve my own game using the lessons she gave. So to every hard-working friend I have out there – get this book, get this book on paper, and while you’re at it, get those neon-colored sticky bookmarks to mark the pages, and maybe a couple sharpies too. There’ll be a lot to mark down, highlight, and take notes from.

For good measure, a rephrased quote: ask for more than you need, because no one got more than they asked for.

And now, the bad part. I was perfectly okay with telling myself I can’t control the situation, so I must control how I react to it. I was okay with “some things you can’t change, and that’s okay” going with “I don’t believe in impossible“. I was happy at the start of the book, when Lilly thanked her past self for listening and keeping on. But then, when we reach another truly important lesson of how to stay grounded, and not let the success of conquering get to your head, Lilly said: believe in a higher power. Not god per se, but a higher power of your choosing. Thank this higher power for what you have, because without them… wait wait… wait. Without them you wouldn’t be where you are, and wouldn’t have what you have, and this all would not be possible? If we speak in terms of Nature – thanks for being here, and thus making me, a human with opposable thumbs, possible – okay, thanks Mother Nature! But my hard work? No. I’ll rather believe in Minecraft random spawn point: you can give in and make a new world for yourself, or you can make it work. So in the end I chose to pretend this chapter didn’t exist, and stick with the idea it taught: you’re not the biggest bawse – as the idea it preached before – there’s always someone to learn from. I gave this book 4 out of 5, even if Lilly’s bargain skills made it real hard to not give it the whole five. It’s a great book, truly worth having.

Categories: 4-5, Biographies, Inspirational | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Felicia Day – You’re Never Weird on the Internet (Almost)

YoureNeverWeirdOnTheInternetI guess I’m a pretty impulsive person. If I decide to learn something one day – I will spend whole day learning it. Back in the day I decided to figure out this YouTube thing before it blew up big and everyone was doing it. Yes, my hipster side demanded I get into the social media that others aren’t using much yet, and I speak in terms of Lithuania here. It wasn’t a big deal, in fact, it was all about fan-vids, and music. So I dove in, determined to be the kid who waits for Wednesday episode of some web show you have never heard about, and that’s not aired on TV, ever. First I found these really dull and highly scripted vlogs. Then I found the good kind of vlogs. And then I found the web series, the true series, the good stuff of the web series. The Guild (just “load more” and it’s at the very bottom, everything). And that’s how I got to know Felicia Day. Ever since I’m a great fan, I follow all I can, and while I’d like more, I still admire her ability to keep things from the world that she wants to keep from the world. And of that I learned from her book “You’re Never Weird on the Internet (Almost)” (ISBN 1476785651; 260p.; Goodreads). Don’t be mistaken, she’s a gamer alright, and we get her as the Gamer Girl / Geek Queen all over the net, but this book is not about video games.

This book is about a home-schooled girl who went off to make her dreams. Got crushed, over and over again to that, but got up and started chiseling at the industry again. All up until the day her determination paid off, and she realized she has made a crack enough to wiggle in and make something of her own. A place for herself. The road to that was hard and bumpy not just because of the industry, and nasty people within. She fell for depression and addiction too. Video games can be much better than real life, especially when you’re socially awkward but still want to connect, and I myself can say that the best friends I have are mostly there because one day I met them in a video game. So I understand her completely. And she’s not vilifying anything, she’s still a gamer! All she says is that there’s more to it, that you can’t bury your dreams under a layer of current comfort, be it video games, books, movies, whatever. Kick yourself and do it. Your guild will not fall if you take one day off to write on your biography, go out have a coffee, or even try a new video game. And if you fail at what you do – don’t beat yourself over it. If you want it still – do it again. And again. And again if you have to. Like a quest you can repeat if you fail. Like a book chapter you can re-read if you couldn’t figure it out.

Felicia day is killer funny. I laughed my ass off on every page. Love what an anxious ball of stress she is, and how, in the end, she just rolls with it. She’s inspiring, and everyone could use a bit of that, right? At the end of the book she tells all about how she entered a support group that basically guilt-tripped her into writing something, and she got the Guild born. How she collected trash off the street, due to having absolutely no budget, and being a perfectionist who wanted the set just damn right. I read this book in one sitting, and I regret it, due to being unable to read it the next day again, and that’s all the bad I can say. Here’s a 5 out of 5, and now someone please go buy bookmarks and jewelry I make, because I want to get a hard copy of this too, audio + pdf for illustrations is just not enough.

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Categories: 5-5, Books: Everything | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

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