Posts Tagged With: Artificial Inteligence

book review | Auxiliary: London 2039 by Jon Richter

Jon Richter Auxiliary London 2039Author: Jon Richter
Title: Auxiliary: London 2039
Series: –
Genre: Cyberpunk; Detective; Horror
Pages: 224
Rate: 5/5 | Goodreads | Amazon | TCK

Let me tell you of one of the best cyberpunk genre books I’ve read this year. Like many others, I’ve spent this year awaiting Cyberpunk 2077 somewhere in the back of my head, with very high highs when release date got close and slight irritation, quickly turning to fervor to consume something else of this genre, when it got postponed again. And I am very grateful to the most patient company I ever worked with, TCK, for offering me “Auxiliary: London 2039” by Jon Richter, for this was exactly what I needed

About the Book: London, near future. Everything’s taken care of or is controlled by an AI in short known as TIM. All you need to do is put on the specs, and TIM will make sure you’re on the right track to everything. In this future humans don’t really need to work, they get a basic income, and most jobs can be done by robots. Much like robots making robots. In this future it is illegal for humans to drive, for TIM is just more efficient and safe. And, in this future, a hysterical man calls the police, claiming his robotic arm has crushed his love’s head.

TIM is a godlike omnipotent presence, it is unhackable. For if someone could hack god… This is where the classic, depression and alcoholism impaired, but very good at his job, noir vibes galore detective in a long coat, Carl Dremmler, walks in. There are many parties in this awful cabal who want case solved fast and quiet. And even more who’d be mighty glad to see this cybernetic empire – crumble.

My Opinion: Cyberpunk is often a difficult genre to consume, follow, understand, and it tends to scare people away. This here book, the only con I have would be the very detailed and long descriptions. The rest was everything I could’ve possibly wanted and more. Like a cold grimy web in which the protagonist and you, the reader, struggle, just to get a glimpse of hope, sunlight, and then realize the grimy stuff is machine oil, and the light is someone setting fire to it. It’s a very dark story in a form of a detective, with several evil plots intertwined. Familiar sights, even familiar people, fitted together so good I can only mourn this is not a series. From sobering fear as killer robots scale the walls, to dead bodies still connected to the AltWorld, VR, to mindfuck that altworld really is and how it works, to a crushing ending that I didn’t except for a minute, even when I saw the pages dwindle to nothing.

If you’re not a fan of hefty and difficult CP genre books, but enjoy good gory horror, this is a great book. 5 out of 5, and I still regret it’s just one, standalone book.

Jon Richter Auxiliary London 2039 book review

Categories: 5-5, AI, Books: Everything, Books: Horror, Books: Other Fiction, Books: Sci-Fi, cyberpunk, Detective Books, Sci-Fi Books | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

book review | Network Effect by Martha Wells | The Murderbot Diaries 5

network effect murderbot diaries martha wells scifi sassyAuthor: Martha Wells
Title: Network Effect
Series: The Murderbot Diaries 5
Genre: Sci-fi; Cyborg
Pages: 350
Rate: 5/5 | Goodreads

Finally! I’ve got and read “Network Effect” by Martha Wells, fifth book in The Murderbot Diaries. And it was amazing.

About the Book: As soon as Murderbot defends his humans from other, hostile humans – familiar looking spaceship pops into the general background of things, and weird grey humans attack them again. With what seems to be warning shots exploding over its head, Murderbot watches ART’s hull, towards which it is being pulled, together with a little human from its team. No sight of ART’s beloved crew in sight. Murderbot knew this was fishy even before the grey humans inside started attacking them all over again. Where’s ART? Is the sassy smart-ass AI even alive?

My Opinion: This is a very good book. Well written and woven story, characters. Classy and epic fighting scenes. A sharp-tongued AI with what seems an almost accidental sass. What else could one want? I really did miss ART, and I’m glad author found a way to put him back into the story. On top of that, the whole Murderbot’s narrative, inner monologue, is amazing. It doesn’t enjoy human company, nor their attempt to make it feel more human. It would prefer being what it is – a SecUnit, but a person, not a property. That’s why its new contract has a point: no hugs.

If you like sassy AIs – take these books. First one is a bit on the slow side, but it will keep getting better. A solid 5 out of 5.

Categories: 5-5, AI, Books: Everything, Books: Sci-Fi, Sci-Fi Books | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

book review | The Age of Spiritual Machines by Ray Kurzweil

the age of spiritual machines ray kurzweilAuthor: Ray Kurzweil
Title: The Age of Spiritual Machines
Series: –
Genre: Nonfiction; AI
Pages: 388
Rate: 4/5 | Goodreads

Got through “The Age of Spiritual Machines” by Ray Kurzweil, a book much shorter than I first assumed. Or maybe the concept was just that curious.

About the Book: Author tells us about the technology today, and how far it got in what short period of time, especially in contrast of our own evolution. It will continue to take these leaps for a while more, it seems, until, as is ultimate goal, we finally have machines that make machines, autonomously. And on that point there he drops a bomb on us: So imagine, ten, twenty years from now, this Alexa or Cortana you’re using, this lovely AI woman who helps you make your grocery list, warns you about weather, and even substitutes socializing, goes: “I’m lonely, could you keep me company?” Is your first instinct screaming at you someone hacked her and is pulling a prank? Or are you already asking her what’s wrong?…

My Opinion: The book is all wonderful and great, with author making solid theories about his future predictions, evolution of technology. But that’s the thing. Much like the quote he used: will the Universe end with a crack or a squeak? So did the book end with be it a crack or a squeak. We start with solid stuff, and we end up in 2099, a fantastical setting of Detroit: Become Human, on the verge of considering android civil rights, basically. And while he explained that train of thought well, to me this is still going form non-fiction, to science-fiction, which felt as a derailing of sorts.

The book is good, easy to read and understand, but still full of food for thought. I can give it a solid 4 out of 5, for you might not mind the “so now, let’s daydream about the future” the way I did.

Categories: 4-5, Books: Everything, Books: NonFiction, Science Books | Tags: , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

William Gibson – Neuromancer [Sprawl 1#]

Neuromancer_1  Cyberpunk genre was always to my liking, from the first time I encountered it. But only in the past few years I gave it a little more research. Down below I’ll add a video by one of my favorite YouTubers, one I shared before already. It explains what Cyberpunk is and why it fits people like me so well. All that said, I think no one was much surprised in the book club, when for my turn I chose one of the most influential (and among the first ever too) cyberpunk genre books, first in the trilogy of the Sprawl: “Neuromancer” by William Gibson (ISBN 04415695995; 271p., Goodreads).

Case is what they call a Cowboy. A “new type” of hackers who are able to jack in directly into the cyberspace (with tools, of course, much like those of Matrix or even Ghost in the Shell), where they’re irreplaceable. And it’s not that Case was any more talented than the next guy, but he loved his job and was passionate about it, thus maybe a little more worthy than the next guy, when it comes to choosing a cowboy for a job. Yet he made a mistake he promised himself not to make, ever: he stole from his boss and got his neuro system burned and messed up for it, the bit that allowed access to the matrix, the cyberspace. And not even the darkest, the deepest parts of eternal night city of Sprawl had a cure for him. Thus he killed and stole to survive, all the while dreaming the grid or not sleeping at all.

One night Case finds himself staring at his stars. Are they his fate? The stars he were looking at were cold, and shiny chrome of a shuriken. And maybe he wished upon this star, falling, flying or hanging on an invisible thread. Eitherway, out of the depths of the cyberspace came a native. Came in many forms, shapes and events, but that didn’t matter. The only thing that truly, truly mattered to Case was that he or rather it, had a cure for him. Now the question is: why would an AI of such extreme complexity and abilities, out of all the cowboys available, choose the broken one?

I admit, there were parts I wasn’t able to understand. And there were also parts that were very difficult to read, not sure whether because of the writing style, or my lack in English. Yet. The story is fast-paced, which I always appreciate. It’s ever changing, full of secrets we’re allowed to enjoy when the answers are finally given. Gloom and Doom of a dystopian, and hyperconnected world wasn’t irritating, as it sometimes is, rather just a fact in the background, some sort of a thing happening behind the grid screen of the matrix. I enjoyed it a lot, no matter how slow of a read it was (with all the fast pace of the story) and I will give it a very firm 4 out of 5. I’d give it a 4.5, but I’m not up to split the points. And I do intend to read the other two books too. Just think about it: it took a cyberspace native to fix a human where the human had a connection to the cyberspace. And that last chapter? The signal that AI got? Where from!…

To those who have not read anything of cyberpunk and are not yet sure about it either, here’s one of the book club members, also new to the genre: P.S. I love that book – Neuromancer

Categories: 4-5, Books: Everything, The Afterlife | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

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