Pirate Books

V.E. Schwab – A Conjuring of Light [3]

A Conjuring of Light by V.E. SchwabMy journey through Londons ends, and I must say, I’m fairly content about it. With “A Conjuring of Light” by V.E. Schwab (Shades of Magic 3; ISBN 0765387468; 624p.; Goodreads) Shades of Magic trilogy ends. Some things were left untold, and it felt natural, for they were the things Red London didn’t speak about. Other things received their dots where dots were needed. And since there’s spoilers further on, my advice is to not read unless you’ve read the previous book. Know that I loved this book.

We’re all familiar with the concept of AI becoming self-aware, and what could that mean to us, to our world. In our “grey” world, if not per se London, this concept is the most interesting among theoretically possible ones, for having no magic means we advanced in other things. Red London, on the other hand, has full-on magic…

Once, due to a mistake, or worship, a spell became self-aware outside the will of the caster. And now this creature, believing self to be a God, for hey, they DID worship it where it’s from, is wrecking havoc on Kell’s home. And, of course, he’s prepared to kill it or die trying.

They say two heads are better than one, so how about four? Kell, Lila, Alucard, and their prisoner, sail out into the ocean, in search of the blackest market of all the black damn markets. If you need it – they have it. If you want it – bargain for it. And they’re nothing if not in need of weapons able to fight a divine power, where revered creatures as Antari don’t stand a chance to compete. Just imagine these four in close ship quarters for a week… Rhy, in the meantime, stays behind to defend London until they return, with a promise to Kell that he won’t get into TOO much trouble until he’s back. But that’s easier said than done, for there’s a monster outside alright, but what about the traitors on the inside?

I love how no one went out for a stroll in Black London, and the myth, more or less, stayed a myth, or at least a forbidden place no one wants to think about, like the ajar closet door at night. I like that prince was so utterly in love with his man, that he listened, and understood, and made things possible, as kings do. I like that Delilah stayed her own woman, with her own agenda, her own mind, even with all the stuff about Kell, and that it was him who got to consider that hey, maybe I’m not actually rooted into one spot after all (I hate those damn stories where girl stays behind, and doesn’t go to some uni, just because her new found love was too dumb to get in anywhere, and had to stay in some miserable hometown of theirs). I love that everything ended so well, and that the end, if firm, is not solid, and if need be – there could be a book 4, but if there never is – reader is content with absolutely everything. It’s a very right, and very good ending to have. So I give it 5 out of 5, something I have never done to an entire series before (I think, I might have done that to Harry Potter, but I can’t recall anymore), and will add it to my favorite list when I’m not too lazy about it.

Categories: 5-5, Books, Books of Supernaturals, Fantasy Books, High Fantasy, LGBTQ+ Books, M/M Literature, Pirate Books | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Oliver Bowden – Assassin’s Creed: Black Flag

AC4_Black_Flag_novel  So there goes my last Oliver Bowden book on Assassins, the “Assassin’s Creed: Black Flag” (ISBN 978-0-425-26296-2). There is one more, of course, newly written to cover the story of AC: Unity, but I intend to finish the current books of Song of Fire and Ice before I pick that one up. So “last” for now.

Gentlemen! As is custom among our kind, we do not plunge headlong into folly on the order of a single madman, but act according to our own collective madness!” 222p.

Edward Kenway began his days as an honest sheep farmer (“I was a sheep-farmer, not one of the sheep“) who was never content with only the things he had. He wished for more. He wished to not only marry the marvelous Caroline Scott, but be worthy of her too. And thus, when fate and men who later turned out to be Templars, took away all he had, including the approval of his parents, he turned towards the sea.
A privateer was a type of a legal pirate, if you please. And Edward firmly stood among those against piracy. Yet circumstances seemed to be forcing him into all sorts of things he didn’t want and thus, the moment he seemed to be saved from the life of a Black Flag – England disowned her sons at the sea. Then and there in waves legends were born: Blackbeard, Mary Read, Captain Vane and of course, Edward Kenway.
Edward didn’t give a damn to what assassin’s might be, but he hated templars for what those have done to him personally. Thus when he took off a hidden blade of a corpse, he had no idea where he was getting into. And who he was crossing.
A great book, I say. Piracy is not glamorized as much as I feared, no, in fact it’s gory and ugly, always ending up in rot if the men in it aren’t quick enough to grab a Pardon there or here. Yet while reading I enjoyed imagining the warm breeze, the possible sounds sails would make, and the smell of a hot-sanded shore, overgrown with palm trees. I’ll give it a firm 5 out of 5, must say this is the best one so far. I’ll miss you all, lads and lasses.

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