2017 In Books

I usually don’t do any of these summaries. Or maybe I just didn’t do them, for I didn’t have much material to write from before. But this year I managed to reach my book goal, and since I challenged myself through the whole year, I figured there’s no reason to stop on the last day either. So, thanks to Goodreads helping me keep track, I decided to apply the one day / day one here too, and tell you what I achieved this year among the books.

  • Officially I’ve read 101 book. Unofficially a 103, one still awaits a review, and one more is reviewed, but waiting (and will wait as long as it needs) for a little cookie entry in my new favorite blog: [Pen&Pin]
  • The longest book I’ve read this year was “Blood and Gold” by Anne Rice, with 752 pages. The shortest one was “The Smuggler and the Warlord” by K.J. Charles with mere, but so very glorious 3 pages of awesome.
  • This year I’ve read “1984” by George Orwell, fully for the first time.

The Best:

  1. Felicia Day “You’re Never Weird on the Internet (almost)
  2. V.E. Schwab “A Gathering of Shadows
  3. Jeaniene Frost “Bound by Flames
  4. Laini Taylor “Strange the Dreamer
  5. A.R. Torre “If You Dare
  6. Neven Iliev “Morningwood: Everybody Loves Large Chests
  7. Adrian Tchaikovsky “Guns of the Dawn
  8. Andy Weir “Artemis
  9. N.K. Jemisin “The Fifth Season
  10. Angie Thomas “The Hate U Give
The Worst:
  1. Hugh Howey “Wool
  2. Kristin Cashore “Graceling
  3. Stephanie Garber “Caraval
  4. Dmitry Glukhovsky “Metro 2035
  5. David Ebershoff “The Danish Girl
  6. Jessica Day George “Silver in Blood
  7. Stephen King “The Gunslinger
  8. Anthony Horowitz “Moriarty
  9. Seth Grahame-Smith “Pride and Prejudice and Zombies
  10. Stephen Seitz “Sherlock Holmes and the Plague of Dracula
  • I’ve only read 3 paper books this year, the rest were one way or another all in digital form. I regret nothing.
  • I’ve read 5 biographies / memoirs
  • I finished 12 series, among them being the whole of Vampire Chronicles by Anne Rice.

I hope your book year was good too, and the next will be even better. Have a great Yellow Earth Dog 2018 Year!

Categories: Books: Everything, Inspirational, Little Joys, Other Blogs | Tags: , | Leave a comment

Lilly Singh – How to be a Bawse: A Guide to Conquering Life

Bawse_final-coverFor past two months I worked twice as hard as I normally do. Worst is not the tiredness I constantly feel, but rather the lack of point in the work, since more work is not necessarily rewarding, or at least it isn’t in short-term. Lilly Singh and her “How to be a Bawse: a Guide to Conquering Life” (ISBN 0425286460; 272p.; Goodreads) was a natural choice here, for a tired, drained mind. It’s biographical, but not a biography. It’s not “the Secret”, and by far not the sugar-coated guide to success via “be positive! love your self! be kind and work hard!”. Rather, it’s a book on previously depressed unicorn who survived, and is about to tell you how conquer.

If a behavior results in free cake, one must always perform that behavior.” – Lilly Singh

My life is often burdened by weekend-hustlers, people who had months to do a fairly big amount of work, but decided to roll their sleeves up on the final weekend, and I, as a translator, need to hurry up for both of us (lesson one: deadlines). Priority fees are then argued (lesson two: bargaining), because these weekend-hustlers feel entitled to their own time, and their own work (lesson three: sense of entitlement), and see me as an obstacle, rather than a tool. And I wish I could translate this damn book for them too (lesson four: goals!). Using her own life as example, and then adding a few more for good measure, Lilly teaches us how hustling, prioritizing, and tunnel-vision really works. It helped me unwind, taught me things, gave me insight on who this Lilly is (I’m a long-term fan, this is just phrasing), and best of all, I can now improve my own game using the lessons she gave. So to every hard-working friend I have out there – get this book, get this book on paper, and while you’re at it, get those neon-colored sticky bookmarks to mark the pages, and maybe a couple sharpies too. There’ll be a lot to mark down, highlight, and take notes from.

For good measure, a rephrased quote: ask for more than you need, because no one got more than they asked for.

And now, the bad part. I was perfectly okay with telling myself I can’t control the situation, so I must control how I react to it. I was okay with “some things you can’t change, and that’s okay” going with “I don’t believe in impossible“. I was happy at the start of the book, when Lilly thanked her past self for listening and keeping on. But then, when we reach another truly important lesson of how to stay grounded, and not let the success of conquering get to your head, Lilly said: believe in a higher power. Not god per se, but a higher power of your choosing. Thank this higher power for what you have, because without them… wait wait… wait. Without them you wouldn’t be where you are, and wouldn’t have what you have, and this all would not be possible? If we speak in terms of Nature – thanks for being here, and thus making me, a human with opposable thumbs, possible – okay, thanks Mother Nature! But my hard work? No. I’ll rather believe in Minecraft random spawn point: you can give in and make a new world for yourself, or you can make it work. So in the end I chose to pretend this chapter didn’t exist, and stick with the idea it taught: you’re not the biggest bawse – as the idea it preached before – there’s always someone to learn from. I gave this book 4 out of 5, even if Lilly’s bargain skills made it real hard to not give it the whole five. It’s a great book, truly worth having.

Categories: 4-5, Biographies, Inspirational | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

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