Books: Funny!

Shane Dawson – I Hate Myselfie: A Collection of Essays

3I liked Shane Dawson. Then I hated Shane Dawson. Then I liked Shane Dawson again, and this time I stayed. I like biographies and memoirs too, so it was just a matter of time until I finally get into his “I Hate Myselfie: A Collection of Essays” (ISBN 1476791546; 228p.; Goodreads). It was a very easy read, full of dark humor, satire, heart-breaking stuff, and, well, character development.

The book is written in short chapters, that don’t continue one another, but tell a story each. They start with a piece of artwork, and a few words about the artist who did it, for which I take my hat off for Shane: it’s always wonderful to see a great artist try to squeeze in as many others into their own light, as possible. There’s no seeming order to them, and criteria is likely only one too – stories that were stepping stones. Stepping stones through which Shane, as hard and unbearable as it was, waded through, grew as a person, and became this wonderful human being that he is today.

He grew up with two brothers, and parents, who eventually got divorced. It didn’t help his meager social life that they had to move, and he had to change schools thus. A morbidly obese kid with a pretty face, as you may guess, is not the popular one. So he spent his days with his mom, alone, or in a group of misfits just like himself. Not one story, no matter how sad or cruel it sounded, ever made me feel like this is a pity show. In fact, I believe Shane to be a very strong person to be able to go through this all, and leave it behind. And what’s not yet behind – is still a work in progress, or at least so it seems from his wonderful videos.

I admit, these stories shone light not only on Shane Dawson himself, but via his prism – on mine too. I recognized some flaws in myself, and much like him – started working on them. Lucky me, I have an example of what not to do too, ha! I will give this book a 5 out of 5, but I don’t know if it’s relevant to those who don’t know Shane Dawson, or do not like him. It felt too personal to be taken out of the perspective of who he is in broader view. And now, to the next one!

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Categories: 5-5, Biographies, Books: Everything, Books: Funny! | Tags: , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Kevin Kwan – Rich People Problems | Crazy Rich Asians 3

1Ah. It’s been a long time, fam, since the last time I’ve read a third book in the series, not realizing there’s the first and the second before it. But here I am, in the Age of Goodreads, with “Rich People Problems” by Kevin Kwan (Crazy Rich Asians 3; ISBN 0385542232; 398p.; Goodreads), third book in the series, or trilogy, I don’t even know. Must say, it was pretty good. Not the best of the best, and neither the funniest in the genre or, well, in general. But it was amusing, and I think I will read the other two too.

Shang-Young clan is a mighty and wide family, with each child and grandchild on one path to greatness or another. Some married as class demands, and are now as good as royalty, sporting pretty ridiculous titles, and demanding to be treated with full protocol. Others pursued love. While in rare cases it didn’t bring much money, most were still happy. With more commonly the children of these love marriages being bitter about not being anyone of importance, virtually nobodies, in the thick cream of Singaporean somebodies. And of course, there are those who had falling outs with the family, society, or just chose too extreme a lifestyle to be part of anything Shang-Young related. All up until they all ended up united by the deathbed of their beloved mother and grandmother, Su Yi. After a heart failure, this might truly be the last time for them to be with her, and possibly – make it up to her, and get into that lavish will…

Su Yi has a chance to set her records straight, now that the sudden heart failure has rendered her sort of free, and with majority of the family – at hand. Thus, behind the backs of loving and/or greedy children and grandchildren, she pulls at her strings. With the help of the loyal servants, whose faith is in her hands too, she intends to give blessings where blessings are due, forgiveness where such is needed, and her own apologies, in hopes to see the most loved ones return to the flock. After all, it is those latter ones she needs to entrust with her biggest secrets, and she has plenty of those. Granny Su Yi will make peace, and make them make peace too!

It’s an amusing read. The main, or rather the general story is pretty plain, and average at best, but the exaggerated stuff was fun. The whole famous rich bloggers from Singapore, the half-white children, the dresses with gold plating, sabotage of enemies, and the terrible need to hide any possible lack in every possible sense. The ridiculousness of these people was what drove this book for me. So I can happily give it a 4 out of 5, and, I guess I’ll read the other two too.

Categories: 4-5, Books: Everything, Books: Funny! | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Video | 10 Worst Female Character Pet Peeves

I agree. And I agree. And I agree.

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Craig Alanson – Paradise | Expeditionary Force 3

+5Expeditionary Force, so far, is a great sci-fi ride that never fails to amuse. Thus, by book three, “Paradise” by Craig Alanson (Expeditionary Force 3; ASIN B01M27RSKA; 447p.; Goodreads) I can truly recommend it to anyone who likes good humor that steps on no toes, and maybe likes sci-fi too. That, I feel, is not mandatory tho.

Skippy the Magnificent, the glorious sassy ass of an artificial intelligence created by an ancient, now long gone alien race, and Joe Bishop, continue their questing among the stars in search for answers, and, really, anything that could help Skippy find his own folk, and maybe help protect Earth doing so. While they’re at it, Joe, with Skippy’s help, does his best to try and help humans left on an alien planned they dubbed Paradise, which is now more of a jail if not a death trap.

In the meantime, humans on the said Paradise are just trying to survive. They’re planting the crops and raising animals, seed stock they were given back in the day, when things were still going pretty well, and no one suspected it’s the first and last shipment. They’re trying to avoid conflicts too, which is very difficult, since humans already split in two camps: those who still support the warring alien race that got them into this mess; and those who understand the truth. On top of it, not even the locals wish to help them, in fear it’ll be taken as opposing the overlords. Peace is, after all, a very fragile thing.

The book is a little dragged, I admit, and the whole make-a-plan and break-a-plan got repetitive, since after a third such break you’re already conditioned to expect it not go accordingly. But the banter, and even the making of those plans, were amusing to read and/or listen to. I can give it a solid 4 out of 5, and be sure, I’ll grab the fourth one sometime soon.

Categories: 4-5, Books: Funny!, Sci-Fi Books | Tags: , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Craig Alanson – SpecOps | Expeditionary Force 2

30342581For whatever reason I find it mighty hard to review sci-fi. You’d think it’s not that different, but it feels like it is. I’ve read “SpecOps” by Craig Alanson (Expeditionary Force 2; ASIN B01GJ6XSW0; 480p.; Goodreads) maybe a month ago, yet here I just sat with it, unable to review. And it was good, it was funny, so why was it so difficult?

Joe Bishop is off on a voyage with the brilliant mastermind AI, created by an ancient civilization, to explore the space a little. Skippy, the AI, agreed to help humans after they were captured, recruited, enslaved, and hunted in exchange for a chance that they, Joe specifically, will help him find out what happened to those like him, his creators, and whatever artifacts they had left. So they saved the humans, saved the world, and… After humans had a little argument over who should get how much credit for what, to whom does the alien spaceship Joe returned in belong, and who should control Skippy, and what should Skippy, for that matter, do – they’re out! Ah, space. So beautiful, and full of evil aliens who kinda want their ship back. Or whoever is in it.

It’s a slow paced story, if as funny as the previous one. Joe is really growing on Skippy the Magnificent, and Joe is learning a lot on the way. For instance, this AI feels himself to be a person, and does not appreciate people not treating him like one. Also, when he calls himself the “magnificent”, he might just not be exaggerating, for not many could rebuild a space ship out of stardust and hope.

I wish they would’ve explored the planet they visited – more. I also wish there was a little more action in this book, for I felt lacking. but other than that, it was just as great as the last one. Not to be an ass myself, I’ll give it 5 out of 5.

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Craig Alanson – Columbus Day | Expeditionary Force [1]

28525188I was missing both humor and sci-fi. Luckily, one of my friends recently discovered audiobooks, and thus was able to provide me with a recommendation of “Columbus Day” by Craig Alanson (Expeditionary Force 1; ASIN B01AIGC31E; 494p.; Goodreads). And let me tell you, it was hilarious.

It was Columbus Day in America when two alien races invaded Earth. One – devastated the land, messing up the infrastructure, electricity, communication, and whatever else it was. The other one seemingly rescued the poor little earthlings and chased the bad guys away. Soon after, they started recruiting Earth’s military to join them in further warring out in the space, on other planets. This is how our hero got onto this paradise-like planet, supervising evacuation of the locals here, the same bad guys who invaded his planet, who, seemingly, merely peacefully cultivated food on this planet. They seem kind and pretty willing to engage. Unlike their new higher-ups, who seem pretty disgusted by these new folk they have to deal with. And yet they still do. Why?

This and many more questions are soon to be answered, as our hero, during one serious battle in which he fought to keep his people, humans, alive, instead of taking sides or helping sides, where he accidentally finds what seems like a shiny beer can. A shiny beer can shaped ancient AI. A shiny beer can shaped ancient AI who is also an utter asshole.

I laughed out loud so many times! It’s a truly well action packed book with a very, very healthy dose of humor and cheek. 5 out of 5, couldn’t give it a point less if I wanted to.

 

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Neven Iliev – Morningwood: Everybody Loves Large Chests | Vol. 1

36469357If a funny book gets noticed, the funny book gets taken and read without waiting in the TBR line. I do like me a good comedy. And I am a gamer, so “Morningwood: Everybody Loves Large Chests” by Neven Iliev (ASIN B076NSQ6JT; 252p; Goodreads) was just a must-have and must-read-now book. I regret nothing!

It all began rather simply. A hero was raiding a low level dungeon on his own, expecting some not too dangerous monsters to help him level up. Then he could at last move on to bigger places, where loot and treasures were automatically better. His wish almost came true when, finally truly lost, he noticed a low level treasure chest at the end of the corridor. Hey, it may not be a monster he wished for, but treasure chest is a treasure chest, and he wasn’t big enough level yet to pass one when found. The chest waited patiently as hero came closer. And as the man finally bent over to open the lid – chest ate him whole. For the treasure chest wasn’t really a treasure chest. It was a mimic in whose nature it was to look like one, that’s all.

After mimic has sated the immediate hunter, it was ready to slump back down and await another traveler. Yet, an undefined thought spread in it’s brainless little head: his surroundings were suspicious, what with all the blood and discarded gear, and might scare off potential food. This logical decision to tidy up has sent the snowball rolling, levels gained, abilities unlocked, decisions more complex than going after food getting made, and even a very beautiful summoned companion mimic could, at the very least, eat up while bored.

The book was very amusing. At first one can’t even expect this is not a story of a hero on a stupid quest, but rather of a little low level mob. It is also very well written and funny, even with all the random gore there and here. Definitely a 5 out of 5.

Categories: 5-5, Books: Fantasy, Books: Funny!, Fantasy Books, high fantasy | Tags: , , , | 1 Comment

Mackenzi Lee “The Gentleman’s Guide to Vice and Virtue” [1]

29283884I waited for “The Gentleman’s Guide to Vice and Virtue” by Mackenzi Lee (ISBN 0062382802; 513p.; Goodreads) even before it was released. Which is a mighty rare thing for a first book (or a stand alone, we’ll see), and not, say, second or third in the series. Luckily, I didn’t get disappointed either!

Henry Montague is a fine man, an heir to a fairly great estate, and a son of great disappointment to his father. He was kicked out of school for, allegedly, starting a fight. He dallies with anyone on two legs, men, and women. He’s rarely ever sober, and shows little to no interest in running the estate! His father’s last hope is a voyage across Europe on which he sends Henry out, together with a very strict guardian, his sister, and his best friend. With whom Henry is secretly in love with…

The tour starts out pretty boring at first. Their guardian keeps his word, and makes sure everyone’s in line. Henry can’t go party, he’s not allowed to drink, and he’s going crazy. Yet he’ll surely miss these simple days once adventures come uninvited. Highway men, pirates… And all due to a damned box he pocketed!

The story was very fun, and often – very funny. It was easy to read, and I’m real happy about everything in it. So I’ll give it 5 out of 5, and won’t mind a sequel if such comes to be.

Categories: 5-5, Books of Occult, Books: Everything, Books: Funny!, Friday: Diversity, LGBTQ+ Books, M/M Literature | Tags: , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Eddie Izzard – Believe Me

24611840Ah, Eddie. It’s hard to not love this wonderful person, with his simple, honest humor. Once I laughed to tears when he cracked a joke about printers, I’ll add the video below if I can find it. So when I saw his memoir “Believe Me: A Memoir of Love, Death, And Jazz Chickens” (ISBN 1611764696; 368p.; Goodreads), I grabbed it right away. Because, come on, it’s the one, and only: Eddie Izzard.

This is the type of memoir I like – about everything, in details, from the beginning, with fill-in’s, and explanations. Eddie Izzard seems to be a mighty flexible person, able to adjust to almost anything. Starting with his career as street performer, then stand-up comedian, writer, TV star, and so on, and to this day. He followed his heart, and so today we know him both as cold hearted killer in, say, Hannibal series, and as that wonderful transgender comedian, a man in a dress on stage, killing it!

When Eddie was still a child – his mother died. He loved her, and still does, very much. Father, unable to care for children, and work at the same time, sent them to boarding school. Eddie, with his poor health, and away from home, and loving parents, felt quite abandoned. Add his gender identity to it, and you get a fairly poor cocktail. Yet his spirit was ever so wonderful, and his wonderful childish discoveries were everything, I tell you. For example, one time someone told their class there’s a spot in, I don’t remember now, either a better class, or even a higher class, and so they asked whether anyone would like to pass there. Before little Eddie could even roll this thought in his head, some kid just raised his hand, and bam, that was that. Eddie thus came to conclusions: if you just learn to raise your hand real fast, one day you might even become the president of some country!

The memoir is full of everything, as I already mentioned, including the backstage of comedian life, what it’s like, how are the people. The only problem people might get with it: Eddie has a mighty complex way to telling his story, full of long sentences, side clauses within, explanations, and even footnotes. It’s not an easy book, is what I’m saying. But oh how worthy it is, 5 out of 5, there’s no way I can give less.

Categories: 5-5, Biographies, Books: Everything, Books: Funny! | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Amy Schumer – The Girl with the Lower Back Tattoo

29405093I love Amy Schumer stand-ups, and I love the reactions of people who’d watch them with you. I could give you a long why’s-that story, but maybe next time. Right now, let’s talk about her biography “The Girl with the Lower Back Tattoo” (ISBN 1501139886; 323p.; Goodreads). I can’t say I enjoyed it much, but it really had some super good points, that made it worth the while.

 

I love how this wonderful comedian owns her truths, and shameful moments. Instead of letting you call her out, she’ll go ahead, and stand up to tell you about it herself! And it’s great not only on a personal scale of her, me, you. It’s important in a larger scale of the world too. For instance, she mentioned the stigma in America of Old Money vs Young Money. Old Money equals being born into money. You’re a rich refined kid in a fancy car, with little understanding of what this poverty thing is. Young Money is the kind you made on your own, being born average, or in said poverty. Amy bravely admits acting like trash who just won the lottery, not wanting for anything, not saving now, when she could, and instead eating dumplings for months to come later, when she couldn’t. But then she mentions the other aspect of Young Money. The giving aspect. Someone with little to no understanding of what it’s like to need, let alone want something will not feel the same joy Amy had when she finally could afford to give her sister a 10k check. I mean, I guess they could be that good of people, and feel joy, but how many rich people with sense of generosity do you know? Old Money and generous? So here Amy Schumer stands: you can’t judge me, I already judged myself, we’re done, time to move on!

And that’s just one of the great examples. There’s plenty of less good-humored ones, less funny, and even truly sad episodes. Like her broken family, sick father, mother who can’t seem to find her spot in this life, the forced cynicism, ought to protect from attachments to people who will inevitably leave your life anyway.

And while I see great value in this book, and respect Amy Schumer, I can’t say I enjoyed this book as much as I did some other biographies of wonderful women out there. But I guess that’s the thing, right? She passed a good message, and you don’t have to like the way it was given, to see the value in it. 4 out of 5 to the girl with the lower back tattoo.

Categories: 4-5, Biographies, Books: Everything, Books: Funny! | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

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