Author Archives: Nosferatu

About Nosferatu

English ain't my first, pardon the mistakes.

nonfiction | “The Satanic Bible” by Anton Szandor LaVey

1Author: Anton Szandor LaVey
Title: The Satanic Bible
Series: –
Genre: Philosophy, Occult
Pages: 272
Rate: 3/5 | Goodreads

I remember the days when this book appeared. In Lithuania, it disappeared just as quickly, leaving a lot of strange young adults reeling, searching for it. I wasn’t one of them back then, but admittedly I was always curious about all religions. I think the problem was the predominantly god-fearing population I grew up in, never able to become part of it, because none of it made sense. Why would I fear a god who is all loving and forgiving? Why would he make someone this way, and then punish them for being this way? You get my meaning, right? Yet I forgot about this book up until AHS came out with Apocalypse, the Antichrist, and LaVey. So I figured I’ll serve the angsty goth teen that I was, and get this book for myself now.

About: The book right away agrees that yes, the doctrine could be called humanitarian philosophy, and not satanic religion. But that’s really the point. While it teaches you to be a better person, because it really does, believe you me, it also arms you. It arms you against the religion that likely dominates your surroundings, and finds a way to tell you you’re somehow wrong. It points out all the flaws in Christianity, and thus opposes it openly, acting like a sort of, well, for the lack of better word, adversary. For as long as Christianity stands, telling you that you should be afraid of God’s wrath, and thus should maybe sacrifice him a goat or something, there will stand a satanist, telling you the god on earth will never tell you to fear him, nor will he ever ask you to shed blood, because we’re all gods in our own way, and all life is to be respected, and not harmed.

But this great part is very short, likely, added together, no longer than one fourth or third of the book. The rest is translated Enochian texts, prayers, invocations and such.

Mine: It’s a great book that’ll tell you you need to love yourself, care for yourself, and respect others as much as they respect you. Meaning there’s no other cheek, get rid of toxic people from your life. It tells you that consent matters. It tells you that you’re not to be a dick. It tells you there’s no taboos if everyone consents. And then proceeds on telling you so very much about sex, how it should be free and available for all, how you need to seek what you want in it, fulfillment, and so on. I mean it’s all well and good, but I feel like if you’re not 14, you’ll be rolling your eyes at the overbearing emphasis here.

So, all in all, I’m glad I got this book, and that it showed me what this religion is all about. No, it’s not made to convert you, nor is it written in the biblical style either. It’s a very simple philosophy book, with a little too much of not so interesting stuff. So I give it a 3 out of 5, for while I’m glad I’ve read it, it felt like it was written for way younger people than myself, if you get my drift.

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Categories: 3-5, Books of Occult, Books: Everything, Books: NonFiction, Philosophy, Self | Tags: , , , | Leave a comment

fantasy | “Season of Storms” by A. Sapkowski | Witcher Saga 0

9Author: Andrzej Sapkowski
Title: Season of Storms
Series: The Witcher Saga 0
Genre: Fantasy, Dark Fantasy
Pages: 419
Rate: 4/5 | Goodreads

I never expected to pick up another book from the Witcher Saga after I finished the original one. Author himself once claimed he has no intentions on writing more, unless he’d be very, very short of money. And only recently did I find out how little in truth he got from the whole game industry that bought his rights to these marvelous characters. Yet, all in all, I believe he wrote it, because he wanted to write it, all reasons aside.

About: We all get those streaks of bad luck sometimes. To Geralt they began when he was asked to put his swords in a locker for safe-keeping. And, of course, they went missing. It seems that all things that could go wrong – did go wrong. Here he ends up on a boat with crew who robbed a relentless, vengeful creature. There he killed a beast that turned out to be a genetic experiment by one of the oldest mages alive. Top it with a fool goetia practitioner, and you have a whole pot of horseshit at your hands. And while Dandelion is writing romantic ballads out of these troubles, and Geralt tracks his swords, a storm brews around them. For such is the season, of storms. And what is a witcher in such a season, without his swords?

Mine: I really missed this. I missed Geralt, his badass skill, inhuman abilities, ace level sarcasm, and his extreme love for every sorceress he ever lays eyes upon. I missed Dandelion’s attempts to bravery too, and all the possible jokes they told each other, including the “that time this beast barged in on Vesimir in the latrine” stuff. The book is marked as zero, a stand-alone, but I do really strongly suggest you read it after you’re done with them all. That way you won’t get spoilers, for there are plenty. And you’ll get to know what happened before, and after that whole ordeal with Ciri has began. It was very interesting.

So while there were some serious hiccups, I must say, if you’re as nostalgic for Witcher books as I was, you’ll like this one. I’m giving it a very strong 4 out of 5. Would happily add points for the song Dandelion put together at the end, and that one dwarf…

Categories: 4-5, Books: Everything, dark fantasy, Fantasy Books | Tags: , , , | Leave a comment

diversity | “Dread Nation” by Justina Ireland | Dread Nation 1

2Author: Justina Ireland
Title: Dread Nation
Series: Dread Nation 1
Genre: Alternative History, Zombies
Pages: 455
Rate: 4/5 | Goodreads

Character-wise this book was like a gust of fresh air. For instance, our main hero is a young black woman warrior with attitude befitting someone with her skill and their underestimation. Yet, story-wise, the book was very mediocre.

About: The war between states of America has come to a halt when dead started rising on the battlefields, and killing the living. Like a plague they run over the whole nation, and possibly beyond that. Some say it is because slavery has been made illegal. Others care not for this nonsense, and still treat the colored folk as secondary. Which led to schools of combat made especially for them, where people of color were taught to fight and defend.

In some places in America there are walled off safe havens. But safety is relative in places where dead don’t stay dead. Jane McKeen could almost smell her graduation from Miss Preston’s School of Combat as her life got flipped, and the core of it might just lie in one of those places. It all started mildly. Like a lord turning into a shambler mid-ball. Then one of the best families in Baltimore disappeared, leaving everything behind. Next thing you know, she has been packed off to defend one of these undefendable forts people called havens. She was put in lines of poorly trained brothers and sisters of color. She was given weapons which wouldn’t cut grass, let alone zombies. And she was told not to kill, unless necessary… But once hordes come in, of creatures seemingly smarter than the stuff she killed before, she makes her mind up. To survive, and to get some damn answers.

Mine: Somewhere in the background there’s zombies, hordes of them, crawling through forests and planes. Those who died recently are fast, agile. Those who died before are slower, but gather in greater numbers. They are seemingly evolving too… And yet all we get to read about are intrigues, crushes, lies, politics, brutes, and Jane’s want to get away from every place she lands in. She complains about how her weapons are trash for long, long chapters, and yet kills things easy enough. In fact, everyone kills with little to no taste of horror in the air, even when lines are broken, and things start roaming in the streets. It seems all we get is this one narrow bubble with, well, no feeling to it. The only reason it wasn’t boring was Jane herself. I said time and again, a good character can save your lack of plot any day. Jane’s the only reason I’ll continue with the further books, with hopes they’ll improve story-wise. How do you make a zombie book so very… Not?

I don’t know, I didn’t like the way the story was told much. I’ll give it a wobbly 4 out of 5, only because the characters were interesting.

Categories: 4-5, Books: Everything, LGBTQ+ Books, zombies | Tags: , , , , | Leave a comment

sci-fi | “Monster M.D.” by Leighton Lawless

2Author: Leighton Lawless
Title: Monster M.D.
Series: –
Genre: Fantasy, Sci-Fi
Pages: 366
Rate: 2/5 | Goodreads

I really love movie “Bright” on Netflix. It’s full of beautiful views and is packed with action. This book was recommended to me as similar to it: with the basis being a war between monsters and humans, so certain races.

About: Back in the day, when monsters got first discovered, a misinformation was spread of their condition being viral. Aka if you hang around tall people, you will become taller. This allowed humans to push monsters out into secondary class citizenship, underground. But they adjusted, adapted, and prevailed. Which would’ve been fine, since they got out of the way, if not for some scientists trying to debunk viral monsters theory.

A war is brewing. News coverage shows angles that paint monsters as aggressors. And only one man can save the day. The same man whose father got torn apart my monsters back in the day.

Mine: I normally like harem / polyamorous books, but this was just horrible. All of the characters were so shallow, so basic, so very hard-aimed to make the main hero shine in the best light. And he too was a very mediocre character, being the cliche of dorky geek growing up to be the most wanted hottie around. So while they sat around, thinking how to free this one particular monster, using a simulator to predict possible outcomes, this hottie went out to build strategies out of rat shit. Everyone waited for him to figure it out too, even if some already knew what to do and had ideas they didn’t feel like sharing. Why, you ask? Well, how else will the reader know this man is not only hot, but also smart?

This is a no. 2 out of 5, I’m out.

Categories: 2-5, About Msg2TheMing, Books: Fantasy, Fantasy Books, Sci-Fi Books | Tags: , , , , , | Leave a comment

The Worst of 2018

Last year, including comics, I’ve read a little over a hundred books. Some were really great, some were really bad. So let’s move on with the bad.

Disclaimer: this is my personal opinion. It’s one of those instances where we can indeed disagree, and still both be right (unlike some other instances). Let’s read what we want to read!

The Worst of Dracula

  1. “Princess Dracula” by John Patrick Kennedy: You know how you sometimes hear such things as “this person can’t write those people” (“can’t” as in “unable”, not as in “not allowed”), be it white person trying to write a black person and overthinking it, or, as in this case, a man writing a woman. Well, for the first time, I think, I’m witnessing an example of someone having no damn clue, and merely imagining what they’d like to see in this yucky erotic sorta way that is mighty unpleasant to read. E.g. heroine spends maybe two thirds of the books in cold weather, in the forest, stark naked, reminding you of that now and again. No concept of “we need to do something about this problem“, no, what for, bare ass on pine needle bed, fun!
  2. “Dracul” by Dacre Stoker: This book got into the Best list too. The reason why it’s here is because it was one stretched “Historian” by Kostova remake, with Stoker instead of that young woman from Kostova’s book. It’s good if you like that kind of clue-searching for vampires 10 years after the fact that you MIGHT have seen one. But this is not my cup of tea, no.
  3. “Anno Dracula: Johnny Alucard” by Kim Newman: If you think Anne Rice writes high and mighty, describing everything in unbelievable detail, especially things that don’t matter one bit, well… Here’s Kim Newman for ya. He’ll tell you all about it, explain the history of it, tell you a side story on it, explain you the mechanics, and then mention maybe thirty names, just so you’d know how well read he is in the topic he’s writing a fantasy novel about. The only reason I will absolutely continue is because if you’ve not died of old age, or grew a beard like Geralt in The Witcher 3 game, after a too long dialogue – it’s good stories he tells.

The Worst of Fantasy

  1. “Cruel Prince” by Holly Black: I positively hate “frienemies” concept. He treats her like dirt, trash, abuses her. She is afraid of him, hates his guts. Then bump, they run into one another, and she can’t help but to like him oh so much. In my humble opinion this book is why people look down on YA genre. It sends a very shitty message to young women and girls out there. A pig is a pig, being hurt by someone is no excuse to treat someone else like trash. Nor the fact that everyone else does it, and expects it from you. There’s a word for people who change face in convenience, a word I won’t mention.
  2. “Bored of the Rings” by The Harvard Lampoon: A parody. I’ve read many parodies. This is merely an immature joke. Not even that, it’s simply immature, childish, and not funny. Changing letters in words to make them dirty words is not good writing.
  3. “Wolfsong” by TJ Klune: First of all, writing style changed a chapter or two in, and left me very confused. Admittedly it changed for the better, but what the hell anyway? Second of all, so imagine Twilight, that part where Edward leaves Bella, and her life is over, so you just watch her sit in her room, stare out the window. This is that. Packmaster leaves, and he waits. And waits. And waits. Packmaster decided, of course, that it’s best and safest to NOT contact the man you love and went out to protect, because he’s hunted by every bad guy out there, because he’s just that special. You’d KNOW if he die, so no reason to make sure you’d be warned of danger before that. And the guy just waits, and waits. And waits.

The Worst of Vampires

5

  1. “Parasite Life” by Victoria Dalpe: Let’s call things by their names. This girl here tells you what a seductress she is, and how that’s likely due to her vampire nature. While in truth she forced herself onto her friend, then guilt tripped her into helping her, and continued to guilt trip her into feeding her blood. This girl is a predator, a rapist, and I don’t know if author wanted us to be disgusted by her, or is it her way of thinking about these sort of things, but I do hope the latter is not the case. Either way, I don’t want any more.

The Worst of Misc.

  1. “Call me by Your Name” by Andre Aciman: I refused to review this book. It got real popular, real fast, and played well on naive romance seekers who love to love. In truth, the main character is too young, and emotionally very unprepared for the things that are happening. It starts with such nasty scenes as with him sleeping, and this student guy, the main love interest, coming in to what? Watch him sleep? The boy then imagines, hopes, prays that he’d come closer and do things with him, while he’d pretend he’s still asleep. It continues into things actually happening later on, luckily in less rape-y fashion. Still, hero right away regrets what happened, and runs into the arms of a girl who had feelings for him. After having sex with her, he then once again regrets it, and runs back to the guy. All in all, this is a love ladder. Everybody loves the ones who don’t love them, and those love interests use them. I understand why some people choose to only see the best parts of this book, but I cannot. I read a lot of LGBT romances, a lot of homoerotica, and not one book has made me sneer as this one did.
  2. “Welcome to the Night Vale” by Joseph Fink: This is merely not my cup of tea. Those who loved the podcast will likely love the book. To me, this was bitterly annoying. Here’s a thing. It’s completely normal. It’s not really normal to you, but it’s completely normal to them. So let me just point at it six times, and tell you how normal it is.
  3. “Vortena” by Neven Iliev: How about we stop writing of heroine rape in attempts to develop her character, hm? This book is very much a joke, a parody, it’s funny, it’s dirty, and dirtily funny. And then one of the heroines gets raped, and becomes suicidal. I’m sorry, but that left a bitter taste for the rest of the book for me. The only reason I intend to continue with the series is because the being apologized as genuinely as he could, and the woman accepted it, gaining more than she lost. It is not my place to tell a survivor whom to forgive, so I’ll accept this, even if I don’t feel like it was right, by any means.

 

Categories: 1-5, book facts, Books: Everything | Tags: , , | 3 Comments

crime | “Crew” by Tijan | Crew 1

4Author: Tijan
Title: Crew
Series: Crew 1
Genre: Crime, Young Adult
Pages: 500
Rate: 4/5 | Goodreads

Ah. Here’s a book I would’ve loved ten years ago. Even now I thought it was pretty good. Author seems to specialize in these romances of young criminals. The only thing not up my alley was their age. Dunno, I’m almost thirty, high-school seniors just don’t cut it.

About: Bren lost everyone she loved. Her mother died of cancer. Her father drank himself until he landed in prison. Her brother lived his life until he got her guardianship trust upon him. To fill in the void Bren joined the meanest and baddest Wolf Crew. This town is all about the crews, and the gangs. There’s a very clear line between “normals” and “crew“. Everyone did their own thing, operated their own ship, and lived their own lives. Up until someone got fed up with all these dangerous and armed kids. Reforms began. Improved security, special programs, new pressure. Many lost their minds in this new bright spotlight they were put to. Masks fell, some fell with them, others rose out of their ashes. Things are about to change, and change hard.

Mine: Even though romance was better than in most books due to characters being equal counterparts in the Crew and society, I still skimmed over it. I understand we’ve all been high-school teenagers and have loved and done things, but bloody hell, I’m having easier time to process them beating each other up to a pulp than confess eternal love to one another. Another thing, due to the distinct line between normal people and crew people, it felt like reading a fan-fic about werewolf packs. You need to remind yourself these are just humans now and again. Other than that, it was pretty great. Well written, and Bren was interesting too. I knew people like her. Heck, I am still friends with a person like her. It felt familiar, and I liked that little connection.

I really didn’t want to read this book. The annotation is horrible, cheesy. But I decided to read it anyway, and so I can give it a 4 out of 5. For it was really not bad at all. Might be worth looking into Tijan’s bibliography after all.

Categories: 4-5, Books: Crime, Books: Everything, crews, gangs, etc | Tags: , , , , | Leave a comment

diversity | “Armistice” by Lara Elena Donnelly | The Amberlough Dossier

3Author: Lara Elena Donnelly
Title: Armistice
Series: The Amberlough Dossier 2
Genre: Fiction, LGBT Literature
Pages: 400
Rate: 4/5 | Goodreads

The more you read these books, the more interesting they get. I blame the width of the perimeter you must keep your eyes locked on. There’s too many details to actually remember, not just notice. But as I read it for the second time, for I have done so, I figured I’ll read every single one in these series that author will provide. Because damn.

About: Amberlough is being destroyed by war. But the revolutionists are still fighting, the partisans, the guerrilla, known best as Catwalk organisation. Gathered together by former cabaret dancers, and led by them, they live in this nightmare with hope to see Amberlough as beautiful as it once was, free.

Cordelia wants to aid this revolution and survive too. So she smuggles herself into the enemy territory, into Armistice, where she roams around seeking contacts, work, help. She didn’t really expect to find actual friends out here, thriving. Nor that they’ll still want to do anything with her or this revolution, even if they loved their country. But here she is, working for a warmonger, arms smuggler, in hopes she can serve them enough for them to serve her in return.

Politics are more cutthroat and criminal than actual criminal world. Spies double-cross on moments notice. No one can be trusted. Not even your own cold fury and heartache.

Mine: Vintage, glam, smoke, spies, and striptease. The story is so damn attractive that for once, I’ve read and enjoyed every single detail. The world was amazing too, culture so foreign, so different, and yet still familiar enough to accept, understand, see what author did there (5 points if you get the reference). For instance, polygamy is okay, same sex marriage is accepted if not always understood. But gods forbid you’ll have dalliances if you’re a widower. You’ll be destroyed. I loved it. The only minus I got was the amount of names and code-names. Some names were too hard for me to remember, since I’ve a hard time with names as is. Others simply changed along the way. But this could just be my own personal problem. And, for those who care, diversity comes in these forms: most strongest leaders are women here; there’s different orientations present among main characters; main characters are by far not always white; the culture seems based on India and  possibly Middle Asia;

Beautiful book. Maybe not the very best story you’ll ever read, but so damn gorgeous that I, for one, will definitely await more with eager. 4 out of 5, as strong as it gets.

Categories: 4-5, Books: Everything, Books: LGBT, LGBTQ+ Books, Thriller Books | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

dracula | “Powers of Darkness” by Bram Stoker; Valdimar Asamundsson

1Author: Bram Stoker; Valdimar Asamundsson
Title: Powers of Darkness: The Lost Version of Dracula
Series: –
Genre: Horror Literature, Gothic Literature
Pages: 320
Rate: 4/5 | Goodreads

I set myself a small but not easy task. I want to read one book of Dracula every month this year. And I’ve started this challenge real well too, with, seemingly, the lost version of Bram Stoker’s “Dracula”. For he had to edit and censor his for England of those times. But he didn’t have to send the edited version to every other publisher abroad, apparently. So, places like Iceland got something different from what our copies might be.

About: The book is not ground-breakingly different. The essence is exactly the same. Except that here, after a very, very long debate by translators and whoever else at the start, we get different proportions, and slightly differently toned characters. For instance, while we had a fairly short visit at Dracula’s castle, or at least a short description, for it wasn’t all that short for Harker, and then a longer story of the hunt for Dracula in England, here we got the opposite. Most of the book is purely Harker roaming about Dracula’s castle, realizing he’s a prisoner, and that he really, really likes Dracula’s niece. The rest of the book is told very quickly, in meager little chapters, and not in the already familiar diary form. As for differences in characters, Dracula is a bit more blunt, and fairly more sexual being, not at all timid with his words or compliments. Others got some alterations too, but due to lack of interaction with them, since there virtually was no continuation after Harker fled the castle, I’ve nothing to tell other than what translators at the beginning told.

Mine: At the start of the book the translators will tell you high and mighty what this book is supposed to be, how it’s different, how different are the characters, their interactions among themselves. After a long debate, they come to a conclusion that this is: a) a rewriting by Icelandic translator; b) a blessed by Stoker rewriting by Icelandic translator; c) the original that Bram Stoker wrote, but couldn’t publish. In my humble opinion, they spoke too much to serve us what they served. If this is not word-to-word translation, and is instead an abbreviation, for I honestly tell you, at the end we’re told “and then Dracula came, roamed around, and those guys killed him” rephrasing, then I’m more than a little bit upset. And then, if it is an uncut gem, fully translated book, then it is marvelously bad. Either way, it seems, I’m not very happy.

If you like Dracula the way I do, both the historical figure who might have inspired Stoker, and the myth, the legend, Count Dracula the Vampire, then you should read this book, no matter what. And Dacre Stoker’s works too, mostly for his own speeches in them. This is also the reason I give this book a 4 out of 5, no less. For otherwise, if you are not a fan, this is not worth that high of a score, no.

Categories: 4-5, Books: Dracula, Gothic Books, vampires | Tags: , , , , , | 2 Comments

The Best of 2018

Last year, including comics, I’ve read a little over a hundred books. Some were really great, some were really bad. Let’s start with the good, and then next Thursday I’ll tell you all about the bad.

Disclaimer: this is my personal opinion. It’s one of those instances where we can indeed disagree, and still both be right (unlike some other instances). Let’s read what we want to read!

Best of Sci-Fi

  1. “The Tea Master and the Detective” by Aliette de Bodard: An amazing Sci-fi, Space Opera book. Very Sherlockian, with a great detective whose intelligence comes off as arrogance. I recommend it very much. And since it’s short, if you hate it, it won’t take long anyway.
  2. “Cinder” by Marissa Meyer: I’ve read her “Heartless” in the past, about the Red Queen from Alice in Wonderland. That one was very unique, and very, very well written indeed. Well, this one’s just as unique. It got some cyberpunk elements to it too, so keep it in mind if you’re into the harder sci-fi driven cyberpunk.

Best of Crime

  1. “Ghost Man” by Roger Hobbs: This book rekindled my love for crime books and showed me that I prefer the ones told from the criminal point of view. Especially if they know what they’re doing. Jack slid through danger like an eel, thinking on his feet, and came out the better for it.
  2. “Vanishing Games” by Roger Hobbs: Yep, second book to the Ghost Man, this one is just  as amazing. At first I was dreading it’ll become a fatal romance, like Bonnie and Clyde or something, but it didn’t.

Sadly author died a couple years prior due to an overdose. It is very sad when people die, especially from things preventable. Even more sad when they had a mind like this.

Best of Horror

  1. “Misery” by Stephen King: I had to re-think my views on Stephen King. You see, I don’t much like his books. I find his plots too stretched out, and often lacking in actual blood curdling horror that one can’t help but expect from a man dubbed the King of Horror. But this book was terrifying.
  2. “I, Zombie” by Hugh Howey: I’ve read his Wool books, and oh boy were they dull. They sometimes get recommended as “if you liked Metro 2033 by Dmitry Glukhovsky“, well, no. Yes, they’re similar, but no. Yet this book, now, this is something different. It’s terrifying, horrible, and will make you take a moment when you close it. The very idea is different to start with.

Best Misc. 

  1. “Peter, Darling” by Austin Chant: You don’t have to be part of LGBT or Trans community to appreciate the sentence Peter uttered: “I like to fight, that’s what boys do“, and I apologize if that’s not a direct quote. Have you ever caught yourself doing something because you were told you ought to like? Even as a book blogger, have you never felt a need to read certain books, like them, because everyone else did? This is a great book to take if you want to, finally, sift through what is YOU authentically, and what was applied to you from the outside.
  2. “Bangkok 8” by John Burdett: In Lithuanian we only got first three books translated as a trilogy. And after reading them all, I see why. You’ll be happiest if you read the first book. You’ll be happy with the first three. And you’ll be even more happy if after those three, you’ll pretend the rest don’t exist. This one was beautiful, with a character, Sonchai, unlike any other man.
  3. “The Adventures of Charls, the Veretian Cloth Merchant” by C.S. Pacat: I will forever be grateful to C.S. Pacat for her books, for the world she created. It took an outright sledgehammer to my little bubble I lived in. It was getting dark in there, so I appreciate it. This particular book was so clever and funny, I fell in love with every character all over again. And the very last sentence had me laughing out loud.
  4. “Strange Practice” by Vivian Shaw: If you want a classic but modern story of vampires and monsters, with fine adventures, and somewhat familiar, but not yet overused characters, this is the book for you. It was fun, amusing, and very interesting to read.
  5. “Band Sinister” by K.J. Charles: I often say “this KJC book goes straight behind Magpies books“, but I think I finally found the one. This one is my favorite right after the Magpies. It was fluffy, lovely, and fit my own preferences of having people of common mind around you.

Best of Dracula

  1. “Into the Fire” by Jeaniene Frost: I’ve exchanged a couple of sentences with the author, and I’m real pleased to say she’s very genuinely kind person. Her Dracula series are definitely among my very favorite Dracula series out there, and I am very sad I’m done with them.
  2. “Dracul” by Dacre Stoker: This book goes both on best and worst of 2018. For the book itself is a lot like Kostova’s “Historian“, except with Bram Stoker following vampires. I like the concept, and I like how it was born out of actual biography, life as we know it, of Bram Stoker.

 

Categories: 5-5, book facts, Books: Dracula, Books: Everything | Tags: , | Leave a comment

horror | “Plague of the Dead” by Z.A. Recht | Morningstar Strain 1

1Author: Z.A. Recht
Title: Plague of the Dead
Series: Morningstar Strain 1
Genre: Horror Literature, Zombies
Pages: 292
Rate: 2/5 | Goodreads

Such an ominous title. I truly expected hellish creatures, a zombie apocalypse, terror left and right. Instead I got long discussions, plain characters who always make the right decisions, and linear plot from one zombie infested point to another.

About: A virus outbreak tends to be similar every time. Isolated incident. Then isolated cluster. Leading to a few such before it starts spreading all over like wildfire. Even your common flu is scary when it spreads this way. And this? This is a zombie apocalypse, a virus to wipe humanity out.

Virus can take both living and the dead as host. The living are called “runners“, for they’re agile, fast. They’ll chase you down, often in hordes, and you better pray you’re faster than a creature with no sense of what is tired, and doesn’t need to breathe the way you do. But you can kill these the regular way. It’s those who are infected dead, or those who died infected, that are bothersome. They’re quiet, dormant until there’s anything of interest, and will slowly crawl across the desert itself to reach your yet uninfected flesh.

And then we have the backwards effect. From isolated incident to isolated clusters. To plague. To isolated clusters of survivors, to isolated, single survivors.

Mine: A group of soldiers sent to evacuate survivors hops from point to point. Each one either already infested by zombies, or is somehow not deemed worthy of them. While now and again we see them run, because ammo is long gone, most of the time we see them stand there, chatting, deciding what to do. Everyone does the right thing, everyone succeeds or becomes hero for trying. This was the bluntest story, and not in the good way, I’ve read in a long time, with very one-dimensional characters that did not help me progress at all.

Zombies are great. It’s a hard topic to mess up. You’ve a virus, you’ve horror, fear to live, fear to die. The hopelessness of easy infection and very, very difficult destruction of the infected. The book sort of had these traits, but they got buried under politics, who should do what, and why is the place they’re at – bad. 2 out of 5 from me.

Categories: 2-5, Apocaliptic Books, Books: Everything, Books: Horror, zombies | Tags: , , , , , , | 1 Comment

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